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Women's Hoops

The latest news and analysis on college and pro women's basketball.

May 5, 2006 at 9:29 AM

Turns out Bird is beatable

One bummer about forward Lindsey Yamasaki being cut this week is she is one of the rare people that knows what it’s like to beat Sue Bird on the basketball court. A native New Yorker, Bird doesn’t like to lose at anything • from bowling to dodge ball and especially not basketball.
Yamasaki was part of the storied Oregon City Pioneer teams that won national championships in 1995, 1996, and 1997. And when Bird was a junior at Christ the King High in Middle Village, Yamasaki’s team flew in to hand the Royals a 20-point loss. It was one of two losses for Bird that season, if she remembers correctly.
“We played exceptionally well and were ranked No. 1 [in the nation] at the time,” Yamasaki said before training camp began.
You know I had to tease Bird about the game after practice on Thursday. She was bashful, groaning about the memory, but owned up to the loss and adding that her dad has tape of some of her old battles with Yamasaki. Turns out the two played each other several times through AAU ball • Bird saying that Yamasaki has been 6-foot-1 since age 8.
“I was 4-11 and guarding her!” Bird said. “Yeah, [in high school] they killed us. But they were really good.”
Raining men
Guess the WNBA found a way to get men to attend games • make them the mascot.
The Chicago Sky unveiled its sideline leader, a chiseled white dude in skydiving gear aptly named the “Sky Guy.” His bio states he’s the youngest of six, the older five being sisters who loved basketball.
Dunno what this franchise was thinking with this one. The other 13 teams have freaky, furry creatures that kids seem to love, but this is the first quasi-human to energize the stands. We’ll see if he leads other men to the games, but Chicago could have come up with something a little more creative than this.

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