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October 31, 2009 at 7:34 PM

Seattle University reports NCAA infractions

Redhawks.pngSeattle University officially self-reported NCAA infractions to the governing body. The school’s self-imposed punishment was the suspension of three players for the fall quarter. The Redhawks, entering Division-I play, will apply for reinstatement of senior Mercedes Alexander, junior Breanna Salley and sophomore Elle Kerfoot with the NCAA.
The infractions occurred prior to the hiring of coach Joan Bonvicini. Seattle U released the following press release to explain its filing:
Seattle University has informed the NCAA that three student-athletes on the women’s basketball team failed to meet the requisite credit hours for the last spring quarter. As a result, the players will be sitting out competition when play begins this week.
The university is also self-reporting two secondary violations: extra practice time during last spring’s off-season and an impermissible observation of recruits by the previous coach.
All the infractions precede the appointment of head coach Joan Bonvicini and her staff.
“As an institution, we are committed to upholding both the intent and letter of NCAA rules compliance, and we will certainly use this situation as a learning opportunity,” added Director of Athletics Bill Hogan. “While we are hopeful to have the full team back this season, given Coach Joan Bonvicini’s experience, I have the utmost confidence that students will learn and grow from this.”
The students sitting out competition for at least the fall quarter are senior Mercedes Alexander, junior Breanna Salley and sophomore Elle Kerfoot. The university will pursue reinstatement for all three with the NCAA.
Seattle U women’s basketball hosts exhibition games against Northwest University Tuesday and Saint Martin’s University Saturday. The official season opens Nov. 13 against UC Davis.

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