403 Forbidden


nginx
403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx
Follow us:
403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx

Women's Hoops

The latest news and analysis on college and pro women's basketball.

June 26, 2010 at 6:13 PM

Mailbag: What box color did Lauren Jackson use to go red?

Can’t remember which of you asked, I think it was a passing question as you left KeyArena. Anyway, someone wanted to know which product Storm star Lauren Jackson used to dye her hair red.
“Feria,” she said tussling with her messy bun after the Storm defeated Indiana on Friday.
It took four tries to get the first look and she’s already touched-up her roots for the weekend, getting a glossier affect after eight seasons being a blond.

To achieve her funky bun, you need three rubber bands and hair reaching mid-back. Jackson, 29, demonstrated the process of first gathering the locks in a ponytail, then bunching it in a pseudo bun and splitting that into two with wisps of loose hair giving a carefree vibe.
As you can tell from my photo, I love different hair. I’m particularly fascinated with pro basketball players’ hair — NBA included.
It’s rough and with the travel I always wonder how black women stay stylish while sweating. Some, like Storm G Tanisha Wright, don’t care — even though she’s hip with the versatile ‘fro that she’ll either twine into two-strand twists or brush out. Others, like New York G Nikki Blue, travel home nearly once a week to get their hair done.
Phoenix C Tangela Smith actually owns her own salon while others go with natural looks — dreads and braids — to deal with busy schedules and daily sweat. Over the years, especially after the jheri curl phase, as a collective group, players have gotten better with expressing themselves through hair beyond the standard ponytail.
You’ll notice there hasn’t been another Lisa Leslie-Jackson weave incident, too. In case you’re just joining us, Jackson pulled Leslie’s ponytail out at the 2000 Olympics.
“I think we learned to get it extra tight after that,” joked Washington G Alana Beard last year.
The ability makes me wonder why more hair product companies don’t look to the WNBA for endorsers of everything from hair for extensions to stylists capable of achieving the ‘do. If not blessed with curly hair, I’d sure want to know how Minnesota F Rebekkah Brunson keeps it fly.
“We live in an age of celebrity,” said Lindsay Kagawa, director of women’s sports management for Wasserman Media Group. “To get the big, national endorsements — especially in the coveted beauty categories, a player has to transcend basketball and then go up against the Rihanna’s, Beyonce and Scarlett Johansson’s of the world. There are WNBA players who have the potential to compete in these categories, but it takes a real commitment to PR, a cocktail of success, looks and personality and the right decision maker at a company with some money to spend.”
True. And Beyonce does sweat a lot with all that shaking on stage. But I’d like to see that weave make it past a Sancho Lyttle-Erika de Souza (Atlanta) double team. Or what that dye-job would look like if she did it herself.
That would be a better sell.

Comments

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx
403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx