Follow us:

Women's Hoops

The latest news and analysis on college and pro women's basketball.

June 11, 2014 at 10:00 AM

Indiana to honor coach Lin Dunn before matchup against Seattle

DunnChamp

Indiana coach Lin Dunn celebrates winning 2012 WNBA title PHOTO: Michael Conroy / Associated Press

Lin Dunn is headed to the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame and then retirement, but not before a few celebrations are given in her honor. Oh, and that little task of wrapping up the 2014 WNBA season.

The first event in Dunn’s honor is Wednesday when Seattle (4-6) travels to play Indiana (4-4) at 4pm PT on LiveAccess. It’s the second game of a back-to-back for the Storm, defeating Chicago on Tuesday.

Wednesday’s on-court celebration prior to the game bookends Dunn’s career in the WNBA. She was first hired to helped mold the Storm franchise into what it is today, drafting Lauren Jackson (2001) and Sue Bird (2002) during her tenure from 2000-02.

Who could forget the images of Dunn dribbling a basketball through downtown Seattle to garner season-ticket holders to secure the team? I have to thank her for the colorful quotes and endless history lessons to help develop me as a new women’s basketball reporter.

Dunn is retiring after 44 years coaching basketball. She’ll be inducted into the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame on Saturday. She’ll be succeeded in Indiana by associate head coach Stephanie White.

“It’s time,” Dunn, 67, said at a recent press conference. “44 years is a long time, it’s plenty of time and I’ve had some great experiences.”

Dunn, who also coached in the defunct ABL, won a championship with the Fever in 2012. It created one of her more memorable moments, taking the podium from President Obama to share her admiration for him and his family in Dunn’s signature humorous, southern flare. The Fever were in the midst of being honored at the White House for winning the title.

Congrats on entering the Hall, Coach Dunn.

Here’s the White House video:

Comments | More in Storm, Video, WNBA | Topics: Lin Dunn

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►